The Autumn issue of The Baker Street Journal (Vol. 62, No. 3) is here.
Table of  contents:  http://www.bakerstreetjournal.com/articlesandextras/currentcontents.html

The Editor’s Gas-Lamp, Autumn 2012, Vol. 62, No. 3.
Happy talk
by Steven Rothman, Editor
How did you first meet other Sherlockians? Was it at school, at a library, in a bookshop, through the mail, or on the Internet? It really makes little difference. What matters is recalling the excitement with which you were finally able to talk about the stories and the characters with someone else. This conversation, in fact, is what changes us from solitary reader to Sherlockian.
Every description of the Baker Street Irregulars’ January weekend includes the conversations. The clamor of people excitedly talking, exchanging thoughts, updating lives, is as thrilling as the noise level is high.
For connecting people, the Internet is a thing of wonder. But as immediate as machine-enabled chatting is, it doesn’t compare to conversing face to face. For such conversation, local societies are in-valuable. In smaller, more frequent gatherings, Sherlockians can hear talks, share views, eat, drink, and—of course—chat. If you don’t have a local group near you, think about starting one. If you need help discovering nearby groups and Sherlockian resources, here’s a great place to begin:http://sherlockian.net/societies/index.html.
If the thought of running a group seems too daunting, try creating a Meetup in your area. All you have to do is select a time and place a few weeks in advance and see who turns up. You already know that Sherlockian conversation will follow and maybe a local society, too.
The important thing is to reach out to other Sherlockians, enjoy their knowledge and their enthusiasm, and share yours with them.

The Autumn issue of The Baker Street Journal (Vol. 62, No. 3) is here.

Table of  contents:  http://www.bakerstreetjournal.com/articlesandextras/currentcontents.html


The Editor’s Gas-Lamp, Autumn 2012, Vol. 62, No. 3.

Happy talk

by Steven Rothman, Editor

How did you first meet other Sherlockians? Was it at school, at a library, in a bookshop, through the mail, or on the Internet? It really makes little difference. What matters is recalling the excitement with which you were finally able to talk about the stories and the characters with someone else. This conversation, in fact, is what changes us from solitary reader to Sherlockian.

Every description of the Baker Street Irregulars’ January weekend includes the conversations. The clamor of people excitedly talking, exchanging thoughts, updating lives, is as thrilling as the noise level is high.

For connecting people, the Internet is a thing of wonder. But as immediate as machine-enabled chatting is, it doesn’t compare to conversing face to face. For such conversation, local societies are in-valuable. In smaller, more frequent gatherings, Sherlockians can hear talks, share views, eat, drink, and—of course—chat. If you don’t have a local group near you, think about starting one. If you need help discovering nearby groups and Sherlockian resources, here’s a great place to begin:http://sherlockian.net/societies/index.html.

If the thought of running a group seems too daunting, try creating a Meetup in your area. All you have to do is select a time and place a few weeks in advance and see who turns up. You already know that Sherlockian conversation will follow and maybe a local society, too.

The important thing is to reach out to other Sherlockians, enjoy their knowledge and their enthusiasm, and share yours with them.


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