Well, we’ve done it. We’ve finally produced a mega-episode. And what better topic to go all epic on you than the outsized Sherlock Holmes Collections at the University of Minnesota Libraries? Our guest this episode is Tim Johnson, Curator of Special Collections and Rare Books & E. W. McDiarmid Curator of the Sherlock Holmes Collections at the University of Minnesota Libraries.

Tim gives us a nice history of the Norwegian Explorers of Minnesota and the beginnings of the Sherlock Holmes Collections at the university, which was made possible through a number of personal relationships. It includes the additions from the collections of James Iraldi, Philip Hench, Edith Meiser, John Bennett Shaw and Allen Mackler that have contributed to the basis of the vast and varied items that number more than 60,000.

The giant Sherlockian, John Bennett ShawWe discuss much about the collections, including the challenge for a curator of books / librarian when it comes to looking after objects that go far beyond the printed page, as well as the changing nature of donor relations with respect to special collections.

But we would have been remiss if we didn’t spend time on John Bennett Shaw, BSI (“The Hans Sloane of My Age”), who was affectionately known as The Grand Acquisitor and who had all of the collecting discernment of a vacuum cleaner.

Tim opines on what’s next for collectors and the Collections alike, and gives us a hint as to what to expect as far out as 2016. If you’re a researcher or just a curious Sherlockian, there is much available to you, either on a visit to the library or to their site online.

Scott shares a tale of collecting woe - a long sought-after treasure disappears in the blink of an eye. What’s a collector to do?

We head way back to an early edition of the Baker Street Journal - 1946, to be exact - to find our inspiration in “De Jure Inter Gentes" (Vol. 1, No. 3).

Links:


More links available on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, as well as through our accounts on FacebookTwitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine and our Scoop.it page are nice collections of links, articles and images.


 Download this episode by right-clicking the icon and selecting “Save As…” or simply click on the file to listen, or on the player above. (File size: 50.4 MB, 1:49:58)


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And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal - and as always, a very special sponsor.



Check out this episode!


See on Scoop.it - Sherlock. Everywhere.

Everyone loves a good Hound of the Baskervilles or Study in Scarlet. But for a true Sherlock superfan, true insight awaits in Doyle’s final stories, and their only complete radio broadcast.


I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere's insight:

When I listen to Merrison and Williams, and I hear how this relationship of the characters they represent has changed — come together, gone apart, come together again — I think we’re all some version of one, and maybe them of us.


See on thesmartset.com

See on Scoop.it - Sherlock. Everywhere.

The Second Volume of the Eisner-nominated, Glyph Award-winning African-American Sherlock Holmes series by various creators.

I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere's insight:

Get on board this Kickstarter and share - tons of great rewards available! But there are only 4 days left to help reach the goal.


See on kickstarter.com

When an unscrupulous business effectively holds a gun to an author’s head in order to extract a payment, what’s one to do?
In Leslie Klinger’s case, he took the Conan Doyle Estate, Ltd. to court. And this week, following a decision for the plaintiff, the U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals awarded legal fees to the plaintiff and warned the estate away from extortion.
For those who have been following the #FreeSherlock saga (click for our previous coverage), you’ll know that the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit heard arguments in June regarding the appropriate copyright of the Sherlock Holmes stories.
Background
The plaintiff, Leslie Klinger, BSI, had sued for declaratory judgment on the Sherlock Holmes stories, looking for the first 50 to be declared clearly in the public domain, while the Conan Doyle Estate, Ltd., the business entity representing the financial interests of the relatives of Conan Doyle, indicated that Sherlock Holmes as a character was not fully formed until the last story had been written.The 7th Circuit, under Judge Richard Posner, issued a judgement in June (well worth reading; also available here), less than a week following the oral arguments, indicating that the first 50 stories were indeed in the public domain in the United States, and that any character elements that an author might wish to use in new stories would require the permission of the CDE. But stories incorporating elements prior to those stories being written were fair game.In that June decision, Posner pulled on examples ranging from Henry IV Part 1 and Part 2, Henry V and The Merry Wives of Windsor to the Star Wars saga to delineate the features of “flat” and “round” characters and the timing of their character development. Judge Posner said that “perpetual, or nearly perpetual copyright looms once ”one realizes that the Doyle estate is seeking 135 years (1887–2022) of copyright protection for the character of Sherlock Holmes.” He further indicated that later “alterations do not revive the expired copyrights on the original characters.”
Fees Awarded
That brings us to the decision this week (also available as an embedded document below), in which the court considered a request from Klinger to reimburse him the nearly $31,000 in legal fees that he incurred in the appeal. Not included in this request was an additional $39,000 in district court fees.The court decided unanimously in favor of Klinger, awarding him the full amount. Saying that “the defendant’s only defense bordered on the frivolous,” it was clear that the strength of the case was with the plaintiff and that the fees were not unreasonable.And then Posner went one further by deriding the Conan Doyle Estate, Ltd. business strategy as one that induced publishers succumb to the pressure to pay a fee or face high legal fees if they didn’t. The Doyle estate’s business strategy is plain: charge a modest license fee for which there is no legal basis, in the hope that the “rational” writer or publisher asked for the fee will pay it rather than incur a greater cost, in legal expenses, in challenging the legality of the demand. The strategy had worked with Random House; Pegasus was ready to knuckle under; only Klinger (so far as we know) resisted. In effect he was a private attorney general, combating a disreputable business practice—a form of extortion—and he is seeking by the present motion not to obtain a reward but merely to avoid a loss.

In case you think “extortion” is a bit of a stretch, here’s an excerpt from the letter that CDE sent to Pegasus Books:
If you proceed instead to bring out Study in Sherlock II [the original title of In the Company of Sherlock Holmes] unlicensed, do not expect to see it offered for sale by Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and similar retailers. We work with those compan[ies] routinely to weed out unlicensed uses of Sherlock Holmes from their offerings, and will not hesitate to do so with your book as well.
Beyond the extortionate element of the decision, the court also noted that the CDE, in enlisting the support of Amazon et al. in a boycott, was violating anti-trust laws.Perhaps the CDE will take the court’s final recommendation to heart:
It’s time the estate, in its own self-interest, changed its business model.

A Man for All Seasons
But perhaps the most notable and noble accolade in the decision are about Leslie Klinger himself. The court notes that Klinger “has performed a public service…with substantial risk to himself” and yet has simply asked to recoup only his costs, while he “deserves to be rewarded" for "exposing the estate’s unlawful business practices."You can read the entire decision below.
Klinger v. Conan Doyle Estate Ltd. - 7th Circuit Court Awards Damages by I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere

When an unscrupulous business effectively holds a gun to an author’s head in order to extract a payment, what’s one to do?

In Leslie Klinger’s case, he took the Conan Doyle Estate, Ltd. to court. And this week, following a decision for the plaintiff, the U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals awarded legal fees to the plaintiff and warned the estate away from extortion.

For those who have been following the #FreeSherlock saga (click for our previous coverage), you’ll know that the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit heard arguments in June regarding the appropriate copyright of the Sherlock Holmes stories.

Background

The plaintiff, Leslie Klinger, BSI, had sued for declaratory judgment on the Sherlock Holmes stories, looking for the first 50 to be declared clearly in the public domain, while the Conan Doyle Estate, Ltd., the business entity representing the financial interests of the relatives of Conan Doyle, indicated that Sherlock Holmes as a character was not fully formed until the last story had been written.

The 7th Circuit, under Judge Richard Posner, issued a judgement in June (well worth reading; also available here), less than a week following the oral arguments, indicating that the first 50 stories were indeed in the public domain in the United States, and that any character elements that an author might wish to use in new stories would require the permission of the CDE. But stories incorporating elements prior to those stories being written were fair game.

In that June decision, Posner pulled on examples ranging from Henry IV Part 1 and Part 2Henry V and The Merry Wives of Windsor to the Star Wars saga to delineate the features of “flat” and “round” characters and the timing of their character development. Judge Posner said that “perpetual, or nearly perpetual copyright looms once ”one realizes that the Doyle estate is seeking 135 years (1887–2022) of copyright protection for the character of Sherlock Holmes.” He further indicated that later “alterations do not revive the expired copyrights on the original characters.”


Fees Awarded

That brings us to the decision this week (also available as an embedded document below), in which the court considered a request from Klinger to reimburse him the nearly $31,000 in legal fees that he incurred in the appeal. Not included in this request was an additional $39,000 in district court fees.

The court decided unanimously in favor of Klinger, awarding him the full amount. Saying that “the defendant’s only defense bordered on the frivolous,” it was clear that the strength of the case was with the plaintiff and that the fees were not unreasonable.

And then Posner went one further by deriding the Conan Doyle Estate, Ltd. business strategy as one that induced publishers succumb to the pressure to pay a fee or face high legal fees if they didn’t. 
The Doyle estate’s business strategy is plain: charge a modest license fee for which there is no legal basis, in the hope that the “rational” writer or publisher asked for the fee will pay it rather than incur a greater cost, in legal expenses, in challenging the legality of the demand. The strategy had worked with Random House; Pegasus was ready to knuckle under; only Klinger (so far as we know) resisted. In effect he was a private attorney general, combating a disreputable business practice—a form of extortion—and he is seeking by the present motion not to obtain a reward but merely to avoid a loss.

In case you think “extortion” is a bit of a stretch, here’s an excerpt from the letter that CDE sent to Pegasus Books:

If you proceed instead to bring out Study in Sherlock II [the original title of In the Company of Sherlock Holmes] unlicensed, do not expect to see it offered for sale by Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and similar retailers. We work with those compan[ies] routinely to weed out unlicensed uses of Sherlock Holmes from their offerings, and will not hesitate to do so with your book as well.

Beyond the extortionate element of the decision, the court also noted that the CDE, in enlisting the support of Amazon et al. in a boycott, was violating anti-trust laws.

Perhaps the CDE will take the court’s final recommendation to heart:

It’s time the estate, in its own self-interest, changed its business model.

A Man for All Seasons

But perhaps the most notable and noble accolade in the decision are about Leslie Klinger himself. The court notes that Klinger “has performed a public service…with substantial risk to himself” and yet has simply asked to recoup only his costs, while he “deserves to be rewarded" for "exposing the estate’s unlawful business practices."


You can read the entire decision below.


I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere: Collectors Edition of The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes Soundtrack

What we’re listening to.



A general store on Route 66 featuring "a little Ford" [LAST]

It’s summertime and the Sherlocking is easy! In our 66th episode, we travel down the road with the top down and enjoy the sites and news along the way.

Our breezy conversation ranges from hockey and snow (it’s Christmas in July!), which sends us down a rabbit hole of snow in the Canon, to the latest in the #FreeSherlock movement, and then on to some events.

But the real fun begins when Burt and Scott investigate the various iterations of Sherlockian tchotchkes that give us kicks as Sherlockians. As it happens, our little show and site focuses on the intersection of Sherlock Holmes and popular culture, so our dueling top 10 lists should bring a smile to your face.

What did we miss? What would you add to the lists that we started? Let us know with a comment tagged #IHOSE 66.

Speaking of hashtags - don’t forget the contest we mentioned in Episode 65. You have until August 30 to enter for a chance to win the Tom Richmond print of the 8 Sherlock Holmes portrayals.

Our Gas-Lamp this time is “A long, long trail a-winding" from the Spring issue of 2014 (Vol. 64, No. 1) of the Baker Street Journal.

Finally, Burt shares news of his talk at a local library - perhaps serving as a model for like-minded Sherlockians in other communities to do the same.

Links:

 

Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. And please tell a friend about us, in any fashion you feel comfortable.

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email, call us at (774) 221-READ (7323) or use the Speakpipe app right here on the site. Connect with us and other interested Sherlockians on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+, FacebookTwitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine is a nice collection of links, articles and images.

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex PressThe Baker Street Journal - and as always, a very special sponsor.

Bonus Content:

Avid listeners who stay with us for the entire episode will be treated to a little extra something.

 

Image credit: Harry Pherson (Flickr)


Check out this episode!


Visually, the most faithful production of the Sherlock Holmes stories. Jeremy Brett in “The Naval Treaty.”

conchs82:

bakerstreetbabes:

double-zero-agent-alison:

Jeremy Brett in “The Naval Treaty”

Fabulous episode.

The third pic captures his beauty.

Source double-zero-agent-alison


I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere: New Sherlock Holmes Boom? What New Sherlock Holmes Boom?

In an exceedingly well written essay, James O’Leary opines on a subject that may touch the third rail of Sherlockian fandom.

tl;dr

We’ve seen this before. "There is nothing new under the sun." [STUD]

But is it different this time around?


Want to win this Sherlock Holmes print?
The clues are within Episode 65 of I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere: Art in the Blood. 
MAD Magazine artist Tom Richmond joins us to discuss how Sherlock Holmes has inspired his work (and vice versa). During the show, we describe what you have to do to be eligible to win one of his limited edition prints of “The Game’s Afoot!”
Download or listen to the show directly, or subscribe on iTunes.

Want to win this Sherlock Holmes print?

The clues are within Episode 65 of I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere: Art in the Blood

MAD Magazine artist Tom Richmond joins us to discuss how Sherlock Holmes has inspired his work (and vice versa). During the show, we describe what you have to do to be eligible to win one of his limited edition prints of “The Game’s Afoot!”

Download or listen to the show directly, or subscribe on iTunes.



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