granadabrettishholmes:

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YES! New stage still-and it’s a big file! The top photo discovery from the stage stills of “The Secret of Sherlock Holmes” at the Wyndham Theatre, is the largest and most high definition photo scan I’ve found on the Internet yet, with the exception of the more well-known second color still below.

These stage stills keep popping out of unknown corners of the Internet, usually out of forums.  It’s gotten to the point where I’ve found the majority of the entire Pritchard Archive floating about in the dark corners of cyberspace, in Japanese photography collections, in inactive JB fan forum threads and on archived fansites that went inactive more than 10 years ago.

I do believe my newly discovered top photo is the retrospective in “Secret” where Holmes drops his disguise in Watson’s practice in “The Empty House”, leading up to asking Watson’s forgiveness for disappearing for three years after Reichenbach.  It brought me to tears just listening to it after doing the restoration on the sound file, which I posted on my SoundCloud.

 https://soundcloud.com/alison-carter/the-secret-of-sherlock-holmes-act-2

You are our Sherlock Holmes cyber agent!

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Michael Williams and Clive Merrison as Dr. Watson and Sherlock Holmes

In Episode 68, we explored some of the early days of Sherlock Holmes on radio with Bert Coules. We’re pleased to present the second part of that episode as we make a deeper dive into Sherlock Holmes as portrayed in radio productions.

The bulk of our conversation with Bert centers - appropriately so - around the BBC Radio 4 series starring Clive Merrison and Michael Williams (Amazon US | Amazon UK). After selling a dramatized version of The Hound of the Baskervilles to the BBC (which starred Roger Rees), Bert was given the green light to dramatize all 60 Sherlock Holmes stories, serving as the head writer.

Sherlock Holmes - A Merrison or a Paget?The striking resemblance between Sidney Paget’s Sherlock Holmes (r) and Clive Merrison in the role (l).

Bert discusses the casting of the new series, including what was required in a Watson that was an equal partner - and a zinger aimed at Nigel Bruce - as well as the increased comfort felt by the characters and actors over the course of the series recording.You may be surprised to learn how the stories were assigned to the writing team (a scientific method from the BBC, no doubt) and how the writers were “imaginatively faithful” to the stories. Not to mention the backstory behind an alternative ending to “The Solitary Cyclist.”

Of particular interest for us in this show is a multitude of sound clips from the BBC series - including the music that played such a prominent role in some episodes. We did a bit of our own sound design in this episode in keeping with the spirit of the theme.

We also discuss some of the more intriguing guest stars on the series, such as Peter Sallis, Desmond Llewelyn, Brian Blessed and Tom Baker, as well as the “new” Watson during The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, Andrew Sachs. Bert has a great story about how he ended the series in a manner than ensured it will not be continued.

CONTEST ALERT: This episode contains a contest. 

We mentioned Denis Quilley and Patrick Allen as two actors who have been in the BBC Sherlock Holmes radio shows (as Bob Carruthers [SOLI] and Leon Sterndale [DEVI], respectively) and who have also been guest stars in the Granada series (as Leon Sterndale [DEVI] and Col. Sebastian Moran [EMPT], respectively.

There are at least two other actors who have also had guest starring roles in each series. The first individual who emails us the names and their respective roles and stories in each series will win a copy of Bert Coules’ book, 221 BBC: Writing for the World’s Only Complete Dramatized Canon and Beyond.

Merrison, Thorne, Matheson, Williams, Hartly - the Baker Street Regulars The Baker Street Regulars - recurring members of the cast (L to R): 
Clive Merrison (Holmes), Stephen Thorne (Inspector Lestrade), 
Joan Matheson (Mrs. Hudson), Michael Williams (Watson), 
John Hartley (Mycroft Holmes).

 

Our Gas-Lamp this episode, we return to The Baker Street Journal of January 1952 (Vol. 2 No. 1 (New Series)) for Edgar Rosenberger’s poem “Four Ages,” representing the evolution of Sherlock Holmes as portrayed by various actors.

Links:

More links available on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+ (now at over 1895 members!), as well as through our accounts on FacebookTwitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine and our Scoop.it page are nice collections of links, articles and images.

Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. And please tell a friend about us, in any fashion you feel comfortable.

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email (ihearofsherlock AT gmail DOT com), call us at (774) 221-READ (7323).

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal - and as always, a very special sponsor.

     

Check out this episode!


Sherlock Holmes was cool - even 100 years ago.
William Gillette wearing sunglasses in a still shot from the recently-discovered 1916 film Sherlock Holmes.

Sherlock Holmes was cool - even 100 years ago.

William Gillette wearing sunglasses in a still shot from the recently-discovered 1916 film Sherlock Holmes.


BREAKING NEWS: Long-lost 1916 film starring William Gillette as Sherlock Holmes found!
Full story on I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere.

BREAKING NEWS: Long-lost 1916 film starring William Gillette as Sherlock Holmes found!

Full story on I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere.


Sherlock Holmes has a rich history on radio, beginning in the 1930s and running clear through to the 2010s. From William Gillette to Basil Rathbone, Cedric Hardwicke to John Gielgud, and Carlton Hobbs to Roger Rees.

But there is one production that stands heads and shoulders above the rest. The BBC Radio 4 series starring Clive Merrison and Michael Williams managed to do what no other production had done before it: to dramatize all 60 Sherlock Holmes with the same principal cast members.

The head writer behind the project was Bert Coules, and Bert is our guest for a very special two-part series examining the history of Sherlock Holmes on the radio, with a particular focus on the BBC series. In this interview you’ll not only hear Bert’s origins with Sherlock Holmes, but you’ll also be treated to excerpts from some of the productions throughout the 20th century.

And for those of you paying attention, there is a money quote about Nigel Bruce buried within.

In addition to our conversation with Bert, we also get to some very important housekeeping, including announcing the winners of the Tom Richmond print and pen from Episode 65.

Our Gas-Lamp this episode comes to us courtesy of Bert Coules himself, from the original edition of 221 BBC: Writing for the World’s Only Complete Dramatized Canon and Beyond, as we read the Introduction. The updated and revised edition (via the link) is available now from Wessex Press.

 

Links:

 

More links available on The Sherlock Holmes Community on Google+ (now at over 1895 members!), as well as through our accounts on FacebookTwitter and Tumblr. And of course, our web- and app-based Flipboard magazine and our Scoop.it page are nice collections of links, articles and images.

 

Please subscribe to us on iTunes and be kind enough to leave a rating or review for the show. And please tell a friend about us, in any fashion you feel comfortable.

Your thoughts on the show? Leave a comment below, send us an email (ihearofsherlock AT gmail DOT com), call us at (774) 221-READ (7323).

And above all, please let our sponsors know that you heard us rant and rave about their excellence during the programme: Wessex Press and The Baker Street Journal - and as always, a very special sponsor.


Check out this episode!


If Sherlock Holmes had the munchies, according to Sheldon Cooper.


Let’s just call this “The Cooper Bitches.”

Sheldon Cooper invoking Sherlock Holmes.



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